Quick Code: jQuery Sticky Navigation When User Scrolls

Sticky navigation is being used more and more on sites and there’s a good reason why. It improves the UX by making the menu available no matter where the user is on the page. Learn how to create a simple, light-weight jQuery sticky navigation below. Best of all, it’s easy to implement on existing site’s without having to change any existing HTML code!

Sticky navigation is being used more and more on sites and there’s a good reason why. It improves the UX by making the menu available no matter where the user is on the page. Learn how to create a simple, light-weight jQuery sticky navigation below. Best of all, it’s easy to implement on existing site’s without having to change any existing HTML code!

jQuery Sticky Navigation Effect

Without further adieu, let’s jump into the code.

The JavaScript

jQuery(function(){
  var menuOffset = jQuery('#site-navigation')[0].offsetTop;
  jQuery(document).bind('ready scroll',function() {
    var docScroll = jQuery(document).scrollTop();
    if(docScroll >= menuOffset) {
      jQuery('#site-navigation').addClass('fixed').css('width',jQuery('#masthead').width());
    } else {
      jQuery('#site-navigation').removeClass('fixed').removeAttr("width");
    }
   });
});

Fairly basic jQuery code. It will add a class to the navigation when a user scrolls beyond it. Only thing you’ll need to change here is the navigation selector, #site-navigation. Also, you may want to remove .css('width',jQuery('#masthead').width()). That part of the code is more specific to this site.

The CSS

#site-navigation.fixed{
  position:fixed;
  z-index: 9999;
  top:0;
}

Simple stuff! If you’ve got any questions or need help customizing it to meet your needs feel free to shoot me a line below.

Introduce Yourself to SASS and Compass

So you’re a front-end web developer? If so, you probably spend a good portion of your day writing a lot of CSS. I remember those days of copying and pasting over and over again, racking your brain remembering the various vender prefixes, trying to ensure your website is cross-browser compatible, all while doing your best to write solid and clean CSS code.

Ever heard of SASS and Compass? I’ll walk you through how these two powerful tools will be able to speed up development time by doing the heavy lifting for you.

Sass could be defined as a meta-language on top of CSS that helps developers code more elegant syntax for CSS and implements various features that makes building stylesheets more manageable.

SASS & Compass

If code could have relationships, SASS and Compass are soul mates. When I first learned of SASS and then it’s pimp cousin Compass, I was intrigued. In the first couple of projects I worked on where I used these valuable tools, so many of my frustrations were solved. Like magic, I could set some standard site colors and then easily reuse them throughout my stylesheets all while managing that color from a single variable.

Then I came across something called “mixins“. These are analogous to the way many programming languages like PHP work. They let you write CSS in a DRY (Don’t Repeat Yourself) fashion while creating optimized stylesheets that are easier to read, write and edit than the old-school way. Plus with Compass, you’ll have access to several useful mixins which you can quickly incorporate into pre-built CSS frameworks like HTML5 Boilerplate, Susy and more. Even more, you can use them semantically, rather than litter your markup with presentational class names. This is great when working with Drupal theming where it’s not always quick and easy to change classes on elements.

SASS: Syntactically Awesome Stylesheets

SASSOne of the first things that caught my eye when visiting their site was the quote, SASS makes CSS fun again.

Basically, writing SASS is exactly the same as writing CSS… if you so choose. Using the SCSS syntax makes all of your CSS files SASS-ready. The only thing missing is all the exciting features SASS provides. Alternately you can write using the more terse syntax that can save you keystrokes.

Here’s both syntaxes below:

SCSS

Check out how similar SCSS is to CSS. The only thing different here is some variables. This is the method I prefer.

SASS

Tired of those repetitive curly braces and semicolons? They’ve been replaced with a more strict indentation-aware syntax. This method may allow you to type faster and visually scan easier. Both syntaxes are equally functional, so your choice should be based on preference.

Compiled to CSS

Here’s what the compiled CSS from either of the SASS code blocks above:

Install and Setup SASS & Compass

There’s a ton of great resources out there on the web on how to install and setup SASS and Compass. Their own documentation is a great start and should provide you all the information you’ll need to get up and running.

Compass

CompassCompass is SASS built pimp. Without SASS, Compass would be homeless. At the very least, Compass can run in the background and watch when changes get made to your sassy files so it can then re-compile and save it as a production-ready CSS file. That’s awesome and all, but that’s not even close to what this pimp has to offer. Compass allows you to setup your project structure so you can incorporate various frameworks, including your own if you’re a rebel. Out of the box, figuratively, Compass comes with a large number of utility mixins. That’s a lot of bling already, but mosey on over to GitHub and check out the other awesome goodies that people are working on. 960.gs, Susy, HTML5 Boilerplate and a whole lot more are already waiting for you to play around with. In addition, there’s a number of plugins you can incorporate that were created to perform certain specific tasks in CSS. Fancy Buttons is just one of the many plugins that provides a easy way to add progressively enhanced CSS buttons. Another is Lemonade which allows you to compile all of your .png background images into a nice, tidy sprite file.

Variables

One of my favorite features of SASS is the ability to use variables. Variables you say? Yup. It’s incredible that this isn’t already available is plain ‘ole CSS, because it’s so simple and yet powerful. I did a presentation at my job on using SASS and Compass in a new project we were starting. The first thing I heard about SASS was, “Whoa, now I don’t have to remember hex numbers for all my colors!” Or something similar to that. Here’s an example below using variables and functions to do things like change colors.

$my-red: #b80000;
$my-dark-red: darken($my-red, 10%); // renders as #410101
$my-muted-red: desaturate($my-red, 40%); // renders as $5c1919
$my-transparent-red: transparentize($my-red, 0.5); // renders as rgba(115, 2, 2, 0.5)

It doesn’t stop at colors either. SASS variables can be used to store pretty much any value you’ll need to reuse.

$vertical-margin: 24px;
$horizontal-margin: $vertical-margin * 0.5;
div.container {
  margin: $vertical-margin $horizontal-margin;
}

// Renders as:
div.container P
  margin: 24px 12px;
}

Mixins

Mixins are one of the most powerful features of SASS. Mixins allows coder’s to reuse entire snippets of code and even interject logic while doing it. This gives you reusable and flexible ways to style your markup. You’ll be using mixins everywhere, but let’s start by looking at humble html lists. We use lists in html almost as often as we use div’s. They’re versatile, and therefore are often the best semantic element for a given piece of content, be it a menu, a tag cloud, or upcoming concerts.

Let’s look at the mixin for removing bullets from lists that is included with Compass.

Defining the Mixin

This is where we write the code we want to apply to multiple places. This example happens to be included with Compass but you can easily write your own.

// REMOVE BULLETS FROM A LIST
// Turn off the bullet for an element of a list
@mixin no-bullet {
  list-style-image: none;
  list-style-type: none;
  margin-left: 0px;
}
// turns off the bullets for an entire list
// NOTE THAT THIS MIXIN NESTS THE PREVIOUS ONE ON ELEMENTS
@mixin no-bullets {
  list-style: none;
  li {
    @include no-bullet;
  }
}

Including the Mixin

This is how you apply the mixin as you work.

ul.my-list {
  @include no-bullets;
}

Or you can use the shorthand syntax:

ul.my-list
  +no-bullets

Rendered CSS

ul.my-list {
  list-style: none;
}
ul.my-list li {
  list-style-image: none;
  list-style-type: none;
  margin-left: 0px;
}

Mixins are also used when implementing a CSS framework in Compass. My main problem with implementing the increasingly numerous CSS frameworks is that in order to apply the predefined styles you need to use presentational class names in your markup like, span-6. I used to use them anyway in order to gain the other benefits, but it always tasted funny. Mixins are a huge part of overcoming that hurdle. Since mixins can accept arguments we can use them to calculate an element’s width and other properties, and apply those properties to semantic classes. So if your CSS framework has a set of styles that make an element 6 columns wide, set a margin, and float it to the left we can now write a mixin that can be applied to any class. What’s more, we can make that mixin dynamic so that it can calculate that width and margin instead of just dumbly spitting out static declarations. Mixins are part of the reason SASS and Compass make the perfect pair.

Extend

@extend is the new kid on the block, having recently been developed for SASS version 3, and honestly I’ve only recently started to understand it well enough to know when it’s the right tool to reach for. It’s pretty simple to grasp the concept. Sometimes you write a style for an element, and then you want to apply that style to something else, but add a little more to it. For example you might have a call out, and then want to position it on the left or right of the content.

SASS

$horizontal-margin: 18px;
$padding: 6px;
.callout {
  border: 1px solid black;
  padding: $padding;
}

.left-callout {
  @extend .callout;
  float: left;
  margin-right: $horizontal-margin;
}

.right-callout {
  @extend .callout;
  float: right;
  margin-left: $horizontal-margin;
}

Rendered CSS

.callout, .left-callout, .right-callout {
  border: 1px solid black;
  padding: 6px;
}

.left-callout {
  float: left;
  margin-right: 18px;
}

.right-callout {
  float: right;
  margin-left: 18px;
}

Stay Sassy, Austin

SASS and Compass has been added to my arsenal of web development weapons and should be in yours too! Since I’ve started using these two powerful tools, I’ve become spoiled. Give it a try on your next project and you will be too. Here’s to SASS and Compass, the perfect relationship.

CSS4! But, I Just Learned CSS3! A Sneak Peek Into CSS Level 4

[dropcap type=”v2″]H[/dropcap]ave you heard? No, bird is not the word, it’s CSS4. It’s starting to become a hot topic around the web development water cooler. Some of you may be thinking, Great, just when I started to get the hang of CSS3! Well, if it helps any, technically there is no such thing as CSS4. It’s little comfort I know, but you really should be excited. As a front-ender, we should all rejoice when progress is made even if it’s smelly IE crawling past simple milestones like rounded corners (thanks IE 9, about time!). When progress is made, it brings us new exciting tools to add to our development kit, making our life easier and bringing the quality of websites to that next level. CSS is going to that next level with 4, shouldn’t your site?

Continue reading “CSS4! But, I Just Learned CSS3! A Sneak Peek Into CSS Level 4”

OOCSS for Dummies — creating clean, reusable object-oriented CSS for the win!

Ever heard of OOCSS, a.k.a., object-oriented CSS? In this post, we’ll use object-oriented programming to create high performance, clean, reusable CSS — quit rebuilding the same styles and start reusing!

Object-oriented programming is a great technique to apply to your CSS in order to create clean, reusable CSS. Usually OOP is brought up in the context of some back-end language like PHP. In this post, we’ll go over how to apply this technique to your CSS to give it a major performance & maintenance boost. We’ll turn your CSS markup into a lean, mean, clean, high performance styling machine. Let’s dive into object-oriented CSS! Continue reading “OOCSS for Dummies — creating clean, reusable object-oriented CSS for the win!”

Bet I can guess your address! Reverse Geocoding with HTML5 & Google

No, this isn’t one of those bet I can guess your weight or age games you find at places like carnivals and Six Flags. I bet you I can guess your approximate address with HTML and reverse geocoding.

No, this isn’t one of those bet I can guess your weight or age games you find at places like carnivals and Six Flags. I bet you I can guess your approximate address with HTML and reverse geocoding.

Last month I wrote an article on the HTML5 Geolocation API. I’m going to take what I showed you there, expand on it and show you how to take advantage that powerful API and the Google Maps JavaScript API to perform reverse geocoding to find an approximate address.

See it in action!

Turning geographic data like a street address and zip code into geographic coordinates such as latitude and longitude is called geocoding

The process of turning geographic data like a street address and zip code into geographic coordinates such as latitude and longitude is called geocoding. When you do the opposite, turning coordinates into an address, it’s called reverse geocoding. See a live demo below:

I know, I know, it’s not perfect, but it’s a lot closer than we had which at most times was somewhere in the city, state and sometimes just country. And granted, if the user doesn’t allow us to grab their location we’re back to using the IP, but it’s still a pretty good guess. Now only if we could have got Osama Bin Laden to visit one of our webpages while logged on as himself… long shot, but wouldn’t that be awesome if that’s how it went down.


In order to guess your user’s approximate address, just take what we learned in the HTML5 Geolocation Guide to get the user’s latitude and longitude using the HTML5 Geolocation API. Add a little pitch of the Google Maps JavaScript API and BAM! We’ll have a pretty good guess at where their located.

Download Demo Files

The HTML

index.html

All basic stuff, nothing too exciting. Just ensure you load the jQuery library, MaxMind GeoIP API for our fallback and the Google Maps JavaScript API. And of course, the script we’ll write below.

The JavaScript

script.js

A Deeper Look

If you’ve already, I suggest you read my other post on HTML Geolocation to familiarize yourself with 90% of the code above. The rest is fairly simple to understand. You get the coordinates from getCurrentPosition() , then pass them to a printAddress() function, which uses the Google Maps API to perform the reverse geocoding.

The printAddress() function begins by creating a new Google Geocoder object. The Geocoder object gives us access to the geocode() method, which can take in a variety of options and return information based on them.

In this case, we’re using the google.maps.LatLng() method to create a new Google LatLng object that is passed into geocode() in order to get the address. The geocode() method is asynchronous, just like getCurrentPosition(), so we define an inline JavaScript function to handle the callback.

The callback’s response contains two parameters, one for the results and the other for the status code. If the status is OK, then it’s safe to parse the array of GeocoderResults objects stored in the results variable. The results variable is an array since Geocoder may return more than one entry.

Next, check for a GeocoderResults object in the first position of the array and, if it exists, append the formatted_address property to the defined results element.

For more information about reverse geocoding, check out Google’s documentation.

Wrapping Up

screenshot_meetwaysThe possibilities are limitless with what you can do with this functionality. Internet marketers are biting at the bit to start using this technology to drive even better user-specific ads to the eyes of millions. Online game developers like Parallel Kingdom are building ground-breaking web-based massive multiplayer online (MMO) games. With a little extra code, we can turn our code into a mobile app that gives user’s the ability to send their location to a friend or family member with a click of a button. Our imagination has now become the limit with what we can build. The next fives years is sure to be an exciting time in the web development arena bringing the whole world a better internet. Are there any projects you’ve done you can share that use the HTML5 Geolocation API?